Tincture Journal Issue 20 poetry submissions

Poetry submissions for Issue 20 (December 2017) will be open from 13 Sept – 13 Oct. Please send up to five poems in a single file. In the interests of diversity, please note that we are highly unlikely to publish your work in two consecutive issues unless it’s part of a continuing series that we’ve already agreed upon.

We have an Australian focus, but consider writers from all around the world. We would particularly like to see some more English writing from the Asia Pacific region and by Indigenous Australians and Indigenous people around the world. We are committed to publishing a diverse range of voices, including diversity of race, gender, nationality, sexual orientation, and writing experience.

We look forward to reading your submissions!

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Tincture Journal Issue 20 submissions

At Tincture Journal we’re seeking fiction, scripts and creative non-fiction for Issue 20 (December 2017).

Poetry submissions for Issue 20 will open September 13 and close October 13.

We have an Australian focus, but consider writers from all around the world. We would particularly like to see some more English writing from the Asia Pacific region and by Indigenous Australians and Indigenous people around the world. We are committed to publishing a diverse range of voices, including diversity of race, gender, nationality, sexual orientation, and writing experience.

We look forward to reading your submissions!

Writers in their landscapes

Thanks to Queensland Writers Centre for asking me to contribute to WQ’s Writers in their landscapes series. Here’s an extract:

‘We are the children of our landscape,’ wrote Lawrence Durrell in The Alexandria Quartet. ‘[It] dictates behaviour and even thought in the measure to which we are responsive to it.’

I think often about four kinds of landscape: the physical, the natural, the dream, the psychic. All dictate my behaviour and thought, but my responsiveness to each varies.

I’ve learnt that I can’t manipulate, and must accept, my dream and natural landscapes (reiterated by experiencing 2015’s Tropical Cyclone Marcia, which sparked a series of poems for my first collection Glasshouses, and Rockhampton’s 2017 post-Tropical Cyclone Debbie flood), but can largely control my physical and psychic landscapes.

[…]

‘All truly great thoughts,’ declared Nietzsche, ‘are conceived while walking’, and while I don’t agree entirely (some of mine originate in dreams, at my desk, while watching films), I do know that walking, especially at 4pm, when the light is ‘perfect: buttery and dense and fat’, to quote from Hanya Yanagihara’s A Little Life, on desire paths or constructed tracks or both, is crucial to my writing.

You can read my piece in full here.